Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity

To recognize a career of meritorious achievements and outstanding technical contributions by a living individual in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity, and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings.

Prize:
Recipients will receive a $5,000 honorarium, a suitably inscribed plaque, and a medallion fabricated from niobium. A waiving of the registration fee at the ASC where the award is given is included.
Funding:
Funded by the IEEE Council on Superconductivity. The award is funded via Council on Superconductivity Award Fund in the IEEE Foundation.
Presentation:
To be presented at a plenary session of the Applied Superconductivity Conference. After the selection has been made, the awardee shall be encouraged to make a presentation at that plenary session on a topic of his/her choice in the field of applied superconductivity.
Basis for Judgement:
Individuals will be judged for contributions in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings in applied superconductivity.
Eligibility:
Must have been active in the field of applied superconductivity for at least twenty years; must have attended at least three Applied Superconductivity Conferences and must be able to attend the Applied Superconductivity Conference at which award will be made. Land and email submissions accepted.
Nomination Details:

Nominations of candidates for the IEEE Council on Superconductivity Awards can be made by any member of the applied superconductivity community (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity). Members of the Awards Committee may also nominate candidates for the Award.

The documentation necessary to complete the nomination shall include a nomination letter, a detailed curriculum vitae (CV) and completed Nomination Form. The CV should contain detailed contact information for the candidate, the candidate’s educational and employment background, a list of honors, awards and other recognitions (both from IEEE and other organizations) that the candidate has received, and a list of his professional duties that document the role the candidate has played in advancing the science, technology, and commercialization of applied superconductivity. The Nomination Form asks the nominator to identify three (or four) major contributions the nominee has made toward the advancement of applied superconductivity and to describe the impact of these significant scientific, technological or management accomplishments have had on the field of applied superconductivity. Additionally, the nominator must include three letters of endorsement from other members of the applied superconductivity (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity).

The online nomination form (including the letters of endorsement) must be completed no later than 11:59 PM  (UTC) on 24 January of the year in which the award will be presented (unless extension announced).

For further information on the Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity Award, contact:

Joseph Minervini
Chair, Technical & Service Awards Committee
IEEE Council on Superconductivity
[email protected]

Nomination Form:
Sorry...This form is closed to new submissions.

Recipients

Clark Hamilton

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology, in particular:
• for his work in developing high speed, high-resolution superconductor analog to digital converters and,
• for his effort to develop the Josephson voltage standard into a robust system and for promoting and expediting its acceptance worldwide as the International Primary Voltage Standard.


Michael A. Green

For continuing and significant contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for his role in designing, building and testing numerous superconducting magnets and associated cryogenic systems for experiments in various laboratories around the world and for various particle accelerators and their detection systems, and,
• for his services as Chair and Editor of many international conferences including the Applied Superconductivity Conference, the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, and the Magnet Technology Conference.

Yukikazu Iwasa

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his pioneering work in developing techniques for making superconducting joints between NbTi and Nb3Sn wires, and most recently MgB2 wires;
• for formulating the basic design principles to enable high-performance ("adiabatic") LTS magnets used for NMR and MRI to operate nearly quench free;
• for applying HTS into NMR and MRI magnets.
• for educating students and postdocs, and hosting many visiting international scholars to the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory and,
• for authoring the informative textbooks, "Case Studies in Superconducting Magnets," 1st Edition (1994) and 2nd Edition (2009).


Alvin Tollestrup

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity with emphasis on magnets for accelerator applications, in particular:
• for his efforts in leading the pioneering design, testing and commissioning of 1,000 superconducting magnets into the Tevatron at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the
• first large-scale application of superconductivity, and,
• for his efforts in applying the technology of superconductivity to all areas of particle physics and for his leadership in the collaboration of applying high-temperature superconductors to advanced accelerators such as a muon collider.


Bernard Turck

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for the invention of the Tore Supra conductor and for his major role in the commissioning of the Tore Supra superconducting magnet system at CEA–Cadarache, which has been in operation for more than 20 years,
• for his involvement in the development of 40 kA dual channel niobium-tin cable in conduit, a new concept which has been selected for use in ITER, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, and,
• for playing a major role in demonstrating that superconductivity and fusion are compatible technologies.


Shinya Hasuo

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of small-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for directing the superconducting digital effort at Fujitsu Laboratories in the 1980s which developed a whole wafer process capable of fabricating fully functional niobium chips with Josephson junction densities greater than 20,0000,
• for fabricating and testing a superconducting microprocessor with a critical path capable of operating at frequencies more than 10 times faster than a comparable GaAs circuit, which was then state of the art, and
• in recent years, for directing the superconducting digital effort at the International Superconductivity Technology Center (ISTEC) in Japan

William B. Sampson

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for designing some of the first superconducting magnets with magnetic fields exceeding 10 Tesla,
• for pioneering the development of superconducting accelerator magnets using "cosine theta" windings,
• for designing and building one of the earliest 6 Tesla wiggler magnets used in the Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source, and,
• for pioneering development of HTS magnets capable of operating in high radiation environments and for possible use in future accelerator applications.


Paul L. Richards

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor high frequency detectors and mixers, in particular:
• for pioneering the development of SIS devices as mixers and detectors of microwave and millimeter wave radiation specifically for radio astronomy,
• for pioneering the use of superconductor transition edge bolometers and arrays of these bolometers with SQUID readout electronics which have been used for many astronomical applications, and
• for his many contributions to the mapping of the sky at millimeter wavelengths using superconducting

Hisao Hayakawa

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology, in particular
• for his pioneering work in promoting the use of refractory materials, such as niobium and niobium nitride, for the fabrication of Josephson digital circuits and for promoting large scale integration of Single Flux Quantum circuits using trilayer technology,
• for pioneering work in promoting and developing high temperature superconductor Josephson Junction devices and integrated circuits, and
• for his leadership role in recent ISTEC programs to mature both low temperature and high temperature superconductor digital circuits and systems.


Akira Yamamoto

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his contribution to the development of various types of superconducting magnets for High Energy Physics and Particle Accelerator application such as the Large Hadron Collider, and
• for his leadership in the development of particle detector magnets utilizing high-strength aluminum-stabilized Nb-Ti superconductor technology in Particle and Astroparticle Physics