Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity

To recognize a career of meritorious achievements and outstanding technical contributions by a living individual in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity, and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings.

Prize:
Recipients will receive a $5,000 honorarium, a suitably inscribed plaque, and a medallion fabricated from niobium. A waiving of the registration fee at the ASC where the award is given is included.
Funding:
Funded by the IEEE Council on Superconductivity. The award is funded via Council on Superconductivity Award Fund in the IEEE Foundation.
Presentation:
To be presented at a plenary session of the Applied Superconductivity Conference. After the selection has been made, the awardee shall be encouraged to make a presentation at that plenary session on a topic of his/her choice in the field of applied superconductivity.
Basis for Judgement:
Individuals will be judged for contributions in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings in applied superconductivity.
Eligibility:
Must have been active in the field of applied superconductivity for at least twenty years; must have attended at least three Applied Superconductivity Conferences and must be able to attend the Applied Superconductivity Conference at which award will be made. Land and email submissions accepted.
Nomination Details:

Nominations of candidates for the IEEE Council on Superconductivity Awards can be made by any member of the applied superconductivity community (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity). Members of the Awards Committee may also nominate candidates for the Award.

The documentation necessary to complete the nomination shall include a nomination letter, a detailed curriculum vitae (CV) and completed Nomination Form. The CV should contain detailed contact information for the candidate, the candidate’s educational and employment background, a list of honors, awards and other recognitions (both from IEEE and other organizations) that the candidate has received, and a list of his professional duties that document the role the candidate has played in advancing the science, technology, and commercialization of applied superconductivity. The Nomination Form asks the nominator to identify three (or four) major contributions the nominee has made toward the advancement of applied superconductivity and to describe the impact of these significant scientific, technological or management accomplishments have had on the field of applied superconductivity. Additionally, the nominator must include three letters of endorsement from other members of the applied superconductivity (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity).

The online nomination form (including the letters of endorsement) must be completed no later than 11:59 PM  (UTC) on 24 January of the year in which the award will be presented (unless extension announced).

For further information on the Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity Award, contact:

Joseph Minervini
Chair, Technical & Service Awards Committee
IEEE Council on Superconductivity
[email protected]

Nomination Form:
Sorry...This form is closed to new submissions.

Recipients

Lucio Rossi

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his leadership of the Magnet and Superconductor Group in the Accelerator Technology Department at CERN where he was responsible for the acquisition of 1232 superconducting dipole magnets and 392 superconducting quadrupole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider which was the largest single acquisition of superconducting devices in the world.
• for his contributions in the design of various earlier superconducting magnet systems such as the ATLAS BT toroid detector at CERN, and,
• for his mentoring and training, while he was at the University of Milan and INFN, of many of the next generation of leaders in the superconducting magnet community.

Daniel F. Leroy

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for his role in the design, specification, procurement, test and acceptance of 1200 tons of niobium titanium conductors that have been completed within budget and in time to be used in the manufacturing of the magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)
• for employing his broad competences in material sciences, magnetic, mechanical and cryogenics engineering, in the innovative design and construction of the most successful superconducting accelerator magnet models paving the way to the LHC as well as in other relevant aspects of accelerator physics, in many CERN projects, and,
• for educating and training many generations of young researchers at CERN.


Alex I. Braginski

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor applications, in particular:
• for his early work on the fabrication of A-15 conductors and the investigation of their ac losses
• for the fabrication and investigation of A-15 Josephon junctions
• for his leadership of the group at the Westinghouse Central Research Laboratory where he directed a broad program encompassing superconductor materials and both large scale and small scale applications of superconductors
• for his contributions to the technology of HTS thin-film rf SQUIDs, and,
• for his leadership of the group at the Forschungszentrum Julich where he directed a broad and varied research program in HTS thin film technology and SQUID device physics and applications


Herbert Freyhardt

For outstanding and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting materials and conductors; in particular:
• for his early work on the role of dislocations and precipitates on flux pinning in low temperature superconducting materials
• for the development of innovative powder metallurgical technologies
• for the processing of A-15 superconductors
• for pioneering the use of Ion- Beam-Assisted-Deposition (IBAD) techniques for the preparation of YBCO tapes and coated conductors and encouraging programs for the development of coated conductor employing yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) technology, and
• for playing an important role in organizing many very influential workshops on flux pinning and processing of low and high temperature superconductors and, subsequently, chairing the initial European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS)

Romeo Perin

For significant and continuous contributions to large scale applications of superconductivity; in particular:
• for his many contributions in both design and construction of magnets for particle accelerators, including:
• the design and construction of the pioneering project Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) quadrupoles
• the realization of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) magnets at CERN from the design of the first models and prototypes through the difficult and critical phase of industrialization
• for the leadership of the magnet group responsible for developing magnets and superconductors at CERN

Konstantin K. Likharev

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology as a researcher, educator and mentor, in particular,
• for promoting the development Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) digital logic and for pioneering its application in digital technology
• his leadership of two world renowned research groups in the physics and applications of superconductor and single-Cooper-pair devices and circuits, initially, at Moscow State University and, later, at Stony Brook University
• and for his authorship of many seminal papers and books on Josephson junction physics and technology, macroscopic quantum effects and single-Cooper-pair devices.


Alfred D. McInturff

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his many contributions in both conductor development and magnet design, construction and testing at various high energy physics research institutions, including the quadrupole magnets for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center’s Single Pass Linear Collider’s triplet focusing magnets and the final focus of Fermila>Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Texas A&amb’s Tevatron Collider interaction regions
• varying roles from Project to Test Director of “Accelerator Systems String Test 1 and 2 milestone” efforts of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory
• as a member of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider’s String#1 Test team, and, most recently
• as a member of the Supercon group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that produced a series of record setting high field (13-16T) dipole magnets.

Hiromi Hirabayashi

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting magnet technology, in particular:
• for his pioneering work in the development of high field superconducting magnets and their associated cryogenic systems for high energy physics applications both in Japan and internationally
• for training several generations of young researchers in all aspects of particle accelerator technologies
• for the leading role he has played in promoting superconducting magnet technology for accelerator applications through various domestic and international collaborations, conferences and societies

John Clarke

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting electronics as a researcher, educator and mentor, in particular:
• for the elucidation of the fundamental noise limitations of SQUID magnetic sensors
• for the evaluation and exploitation of SQUID magnetic sensors in geophysical exploration, NMR, NQR and MRI
• for low noise SQUID amplifiers, for mentoring a large number of students who subsequently have played major roles in superconductivity research and development groups throughout the world
• for being an articulate advocate for SQUID technology at technical, scientific, and medical conferences and workshops


Fernand D. ("Doc") Bedard

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting electronics, in particular:
• for his long term support of low temperature superconducting digital technology for high performance computing, beginning with the Cryotron in the early 1960s and the IBM Josephson Computer Technology project in the 1970s, and including the Hybrid Technology Multi Threaded (HTMT) petaflops computing program
• for his promotion of the use of superconducting circuits for high performance switches and routers for communications and computing applications, specifically for conceiving the architecture, designing the circuitry and managing the program which has yielded a 128 by 128 self-routing cross-bar switch which can process 2.5 Gbit per second data streams per channel, which is the most complex functional LTS digital system built to date
• for his continuing advocacy of systems-level demonstrations of Josephson digital solutions