The award recognizes a living individual for a career of meritorious achievements and outstanding technical contributions in the field of applied superconductor material technology, over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts and theories proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of many publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductor materials technology, and the impact that the candidate’s contributions have had on the development and maturing of applied superconductivity.

Historical Background:

This award is named for Dr. James Wong who received the IEEE Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity in 2011 for his pioneering work in producing commercial grade superconducting cables and conductors. In 1962, Dr. Wong founded Supercon, Inc. which has produced a variety of niobium-titanium and niobium-tin superconducting wires, cables and conductors for many commercial and research application and has supplied production quantities of high-quality superconducting wire for a longer time than any other company in the world.

Prize:
Recipients will receive a $5,000 honorarium, a suitably inscribed plaque, and a medallion fabricated from niobium.
Funding:
The award is funded from an endowment by the Wong family, managed through the IEEE Foundation. If more than one award is given in any award year, the second award of $5,000 will be funded by the Council on Superconductivity. No more than two awards shall be presented during any award year.
Presentation:
To be presented during an awards ceremony at the Applied Superconductivity Conference or at other international conferences related to applied superconductivity as designated by the President of the IEEE Council on SuperConductivity.
Basis for Judgement:
For contribution to the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally, more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings in applied superconductivity, and the impact that the candidate’s accomplishments have had on the development and maturing of applied superconductivity.
Eligibility:
The recipient must have been active in the field of applied superconductivity for at least twenty years; and must be able to attend the international conference related to applied superconductivity at which the Award will be made. The recipient does not have to be a member of the IEEE and there shall be no restrictions based on nationality, country of residence, age or gender. An individual may receive only one IEEE Council on SuperConductivity sponsored Award for his/her contributions to superconductor materials science and technology.
Nomination Details:

The online nomination form (including and all supporting information and letters of support) must be submitted by no later than 24 January of the award year.

Any questions regarding the nomination process for the Dr. James Wong Award should be directed to:

Joseph Minervini
Chair, Technical & Service Awards Committee
IEEE Council on Superconductivity
[email protected]
 

Recipients

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Kozo Osamura

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductivity materials research, in particular:
• for his development of new techniques to determine the local strain in technical superconductors;
• for advancing the understanding of the impact of strain on superconductor properties, for introducing new methods to improve the mechanical properties of superconducting composites; and,
• for his leading role in the creation of international standards for superconducting materials technology.

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Robert Hammond

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconducting materials research, in particular,
• for development of Ion Beam Assisted Deposition (IBAD) method for making textured buffer on flexible metal tapes, paving the way to manufacture HTS tapes in long production length with high mechanical strength required for very high field magnet;
• for the first demonstration of ternary phase diagram to provide the correlation between in situ growth conditions and thermodynamic stability criteria for YBCO (ReBCO) superconductor, which showed the liquid process was the key in e-beam RCE and subsequent conversion process; and,
• for contributions to control of multi-source co-evaporation of superconducting films, making high-throughput, and cost-effective fabrication of HTS wire possible.

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Judith L. MacManus-Driscoll

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductivity materials research, in particular:
• for the first demonstration of strong pinning enhancement in YBCO-based thin films for coated conductors (using BaZrO3 nanoparticle additions), followed by proposal and demonstration of further improved pinning using group IV and V elemental additions;
• for the first demonstration of pO2-controlled liquid assisted growth of YBCO conductors, and subsequent advocacy of this method for next 20 + years; and
• for undertaking and applying basic materials science studies to demonstrate novel ways to induce very effective pinning in MgB2 and (Bi,Pb)-2212.

Edward W. (Ted) Collings

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductivity materials research, in particular,
• for showing that proximity effect coupling between closely spaced fine filaments in multifilamentary NbTi/Cu composites could be suppressed by the addition of Mn to the Cu matrix,
• for leading the development of NbTi and Nb3Sn Rutherford cables in which cores of selected materials and widths were introduced to control interstrand contact and coupling magnetization,
• for leading a group that developed the world's first HTS Rutherford cable based on Bi:2212/Ag and that went on to produce long lengths of continuously melt processed Nb3Al strand and hence Nb3Al Rutherford cable, and,
• for contributions to the understanding and development of practical MgB2 conductors.

Helmut Krauth

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductivity materials research, in particular,
• development and industrialization of NbTi and Nb3Sn superconductors for fusion, accelerators, MRI and NMR,
• for contributions to science and technology of NbTi and Nb3Sn conductors resulting in improved conductor performance and industrial manufacturing, and
• for contributions to development and commercialization of Bi-2212 and Bi-2223 wires and tapes.

Seung Ok Hong

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductivity materials research, in particular,
• for his role in achieving engineering current densities of over 3000 A-mm-2 in commercial NbTi at 5 T and 4.2 K,
• for his work in commercializing ‘wire in channel’ conductors to provide the low cost, high copper conductor needed for MRI,
• for his work on RRP internal tin Nb3Sn conductors - the first wire to achieve 3000 A-mm-2 at 12 T and 4.2 K, and
• for developing Bi-2212 round wire, enabling HTS Rutherford cable to be made for future accelerators.

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Peter J. Lee

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconducting materials research, in particular,
• for the development of techniques for quantitative digital imaging of defects, flux-pinning sites and chemical composition gradients in niobium-titanium and niobium-3-tin superconductors at all relevant length scales from the atomic to the macroscopic that have enabled significant improvements of their critical current characteristics, and thus enabling conductors to realize the benchmark values of critical current density required for many emerging applications.
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Venkat Selvamanickam

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductivity materials research, in particular,
• for his leadership in the world’s first manufacturing and commercialization of second-generation (2G) HTS wires that culminated in the demonstration of the world’s first 2G HTS device in the electric power grid,
• for pioneering numerous technologies in second-generation HTS wires including high throughput thin film deposition processes to fabricate single-crystalline-like films over a kilometer on metal substrates and nanoscale defect engineering for record-high superconductor wire performance, and
• for conceiving and demonstrating a novel melt-texturing technique that yields large single-domain REBaCuO superconductors with world-record critical current performance, which is being used to manufacture bulk superconductors with very large trapped magnetic fields.

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John R. Clem

For continuing and significant contributions to the development of superconducting materials by advancing the science of both low-temperature and high-temperature superconducting materials, in particular:
• for his many significant theoretical contributions to the electrodynamic behavior of current-carrying superconductors,
• for applying his theoretical understanding to explain the observed behavior in various applications of superconductivity, both large-scale and small-scale,
• for his service as Science Editor of "High-Tc Update" from 1987 to 2000, when he briefly reviewed and summarized the "tsunami" of papers that were written following the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity.

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James Wong

For significant and sustained contributions in the development of low temperature superconducting wires, cables and conductors, in particular:
• for founding Supercon, Inc. in 1962 which has supplied production quantities of high-quality superconducting wire for a longer time than any other firm in the world, and,
• for producing a variety of niobium-titanium and niobium-tin superconducting wires, cables and conductors for many commercial and research application, especially most of the major accelerator programs.