Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity

To recognize a career of meritorious achievements and outstanding technical contributions by a living individual in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity, and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings.

Prize:
Recipients will receive a $5,000 honorarium, a suitably inscribed plaque, and a medallion fabricated from niobium. A waiving of the registration fee at the ASC where the award is given is included.
Funding:
Funded by the IEEE Council on Superconductivity. The award is funded via Council on Superconductivity Award Fund in the IEEE Foundation.
Presentation:
To be presented at a plenary session of the Applied Superconductivity Conference. After the selection has been made, the awardee shall be encouraged to make a presentation at that plenary session on a topic of his/her choice in the field of applied superconductivity.
Basis for Judging:
Individuals will be judged for contributions in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings in applied superconductivity.
Eligibility:
Must have been active in the field of applied superconductivity for at least twenty years; must have attended at least three Applied Superconductivity Conferences and must be able to attend the Applied Superconductivity Conference at which award will be made. Land and email submissions accepted.
Nomination Details:

Nominations of candidates for the IEEE Council on Superconductivity Awards can be made by any member of the applied superconductivity community (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity). Members of the Awards Committee may also nominate candidates for the Award.

The documentation necessary to complete the nomination shall include a nomination letter, a detailed curriculum vitae (CV) and completed Nomination Form. The CV should contain detailed contact information for the candidate, the candidate’s educational and employment background, a list of honors, awards and other recognitions (both from IEEE and other organizations) that the candidate has received, and a list of his professional duties that document the role the candidate has played in advancing the science, technology, and commercialization of applied superconductivity. The Nomination Form asks the nominator to identify three (or four) major contributions the nominee has made toward the advancement of applied superconductivity and to describe the impact of these significant scientific, technological or management accomplishments have had on the field of applied superconductivity. Additionally, the nominator must include three letters of endorsement from other members of the applied superconductivity (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity).

The online nomination form (including the letters of endorsement) must be completed no later than 11:59 PM  (UTC) on 1 February of the year in which the award will be presented (unless extension announced).

For further information on the Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity Award, contact:

Joseph Minervini
Chair, Technical & Service Awards Committee
IEEE Council on Superconductivity
[email protected]

Nomination Form:

Neil Mitchell

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for leadership over 30 years of magnet design, research and development, procurement, manufacturing and testing of the ITER magnets, a system of unprecedented size, weight and stored energy,
• for critical contributions to all aspects of Nb3Sn CICC magnet technology, including the development of new analysis techniques for mechanical, thermal and electrical behavior of large superconducting cables,
• for promoting superconducting technology internationally through worldwide collaborations and organization of scientific events.

Pasquale Fabbricatore

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for design and construction of the Babar detector superconducting magnet,
• for his key role in design and construction of the superconducting coils of the CMS magnet,
• for the leadership and design contribution to the FAIR SIS300 prototype dipole and the Mu2e prototype coil for Fermilab; and,
• for his studies on superconducting cables.


Akira Fujimaki

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of small scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for the introduction of the RSFQ CONNECT cell library which accelerated the development of digital superconducting electronics,
• for critical contributions to the development of SFQ bit-serial microprocessors (CORE series) - the first fully operational SFQ microprocessors demonstrated in this technology; and,
• for his significant role in planning, securing and developing Japanese superconducting electronics programs.

Vitaly Vysotsky

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for pioneering experimental and theoretical research of the superconducting cable stability in ac conditions, and proven cable design approaches;
• for development and testing of the world-first hybrid energy transfer systems combining liquid hydrogen and superconducting MgB2 power cable; and,
• for leading production and on-time delivery of the challenging superconducting cables for ITER that met or exceeded all technical requirements.

Daniel Prober

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductive electronics, in particular:
• for pioneering work on SIS quasiparticle mixers, including the first demonstration of detector sensitivity approaching the quantum limit;
• for inventing the diffusion-cooled hot electron bolometer, a high sensitivity and large-bandwidth superconducting heterodyne mixer;
• for advancements in nanofabrication that have been used to develop ultra-sensitive devices based on superconducting nanostructures; and
• for fundamental studies of noise in mesoscopic superconducting systems, which have improved our understanding of the sensitivity limits of superconducting devices.


Osami Tsukamoto

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for experimentally demonstrating by means of acoustic emission (AE) technique that mechanical disturbances are major sources of premature quenches in LTS adiabatic magnets;
• for stochastic estimation of training effect of LTS adiabatic magnets;
• for fundamental work in ac losses and transient heat transfer in superconducting generators; and
• for his leading contributions to applied superconductivity programs, to student education, and exceptional engagement in his service to the community of Japan.

Luca Bottura

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications, in particular,
• for developing computer codes for the design and analysis of operating margin, stability and quench of cable-in-conduit superconductors,
• for conducting the field measurement of the LHC superconducting magnets, and developing a parametric field model for the LHC operation,
• for leading the development of advanced superconducting magnets for future accelerator projects, and,
• for promoting superconducting technology internationally through technical editorship, scientific networking, and organization of scientific events.


Gregory Goltsman

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductive electronics, in particular:
• for invention and advancement of the superconducting hot-electron bolometric mixer, now one of the key astrophysics detectors,
• for invention and advancement of the superconducting single-photon detector, which has enabled new high-speed optical communication applications,
• for contributions to the understanding of electron energy relaxation processes in impure superconducting films.


Evgeny Yu. Klimenko

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for pioneering works on the forced-flow cooled superconducting magnets,
• for discovery and proof of the key role of smooth superconducting-to-normal state transition for stable operation of superconducting magnets with high current density, and
• for development of the T-15 conductor and qualification program for the first in the world Nb3Sn superconducting Tokamak

Shlomo Caspi

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large scale applications, in particular,
• for key contributions to the design, fabrication and successful testing of multiple record high field accelerator magnets, including the record Cos(θ) magnet D20, the record common coil RD3B and the record block magnets HD1 and HD2,
• for innovations in high field accelerator magnet structures that has enabled the use of strain-sensitive Nb3Sn in high-field accelerator magnets, and,
• for major contributions to modern high-field magnet design and, in particular, to the formulation and systematic implementation of integrated design processes that incorporate 3D magnetic, structural and CAD integration.


Michael Simmonds

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of SQUID-based instrumentation, in particular,
• for pioneering work in developing the revolutionary MPMS3 SQUID-VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer),
• for the design of a double-balanced SQUID which uses a symmetrical geometry to decouple the modulation and input coils, and,
• for devising multiple methods of applying an AC bias to DC SQUIDs to greatly reduce low-frequency noise, enabling their use in a wide variety of applications.

W. Denis Markiewicz

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for his contribution to the development of the technology for very high field solenoids, in the early days with Nb3Sn tape and later with REBCO tape;
• for delivering the first 600 MHz NMR spectrometer magnet, and contributions to the development of clinical magnetic resonance imaging magnets;
• for originating the Ultra-Wide-Bore 900 MHz NMR spectrometer magnet, which allowed significant advances in NMR science and technology;
• for his work on understanding the relation between critical temperature and strain in Nb3Sn.


Oleg Mukhanov

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductor electronic applications, in particular:
• for co-inventing and experimentally verifying the operation of Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) superconducting digital logic circuits, which are currently the logic family most widely used in superconducting digital systems,
• for invention and co-invention of numerous RSFQ circuits and subsystems including Digital-RF Receivers, and
• for inventing a family of very low power dissipation RSFQ circuits for use in superconducting logic and memory in high performance computing systems.


Richard J. Thome

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for his supportive work on understanding cryogenic stabilization; for his contribution to the understanding of electromagnetic forces and stresses in the design of large magnet structures;
• for his project work on magnetic confinement fusion, MHD power generation, magnetic levitation, launchers, and ship propulsion;
• for his leadership of the ITER magnet design team in its early stages; and
• for his contributions to the education and mentoring of many engineers in superconducting technology and magnet system engineering, while working for General Atomics, MIT, Magnetic Corporation of America, and the AVCO Everett Research Laboratory.

Arnaud Devred

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his leadership of a group of scientists at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project who defined test procedures and analytic tools for assessing conformity of magnet performance to the design specifications
• for managing the Next Europe Dipole (NED) program, which successfully developed a high-performance Nb3Sn wire and carried out the design analyses of an 88-mm-aperture, 15-T dipole magnet for LHC upgrade, and,
• for his activities as Technical Responsible Officer for the in-kind procurement of the superconducting Cable-In-Conduit Conductors (CICCs) used in the manufacture of the sophisticated magnet system at the heart of the ITER tokamak.


Catherine P. Foley

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductor electronic applications, in particular,
• for the development of a novel form of YBCO, grain boundary Josephson junction and its incorporation into sensitive HTS SQUID magnetometer systems,
• for the development and commercialization of the LANDTEM geophysical survey system that has located mineral deposits worth more than US$ 6 billion,
• for her service to the applied superconductivity community through service on numerous committees and boards, including those promoting the recruiting and mentoring of women in science and engineering.


Bruce Gamble

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale superconductor power applications, in particular,
• for his leadership and technical contributions to the development of LTS and HTS rotating machinery, culminating in a successful demonstration of a 36 Megawatt HTS ship propulsion motor, and,
• the demonstration of an 8 Megawatt HTS synchronous condenser and
• HTS fault current limiters, culminating in the demonstration of a transmission level system for the electric power grid.


Kent D. Irwin

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductor electronic applications, in particular,
• for proposing and demonstrating the concept of voltage biased transition edge sensors (TES) which yielded extremely stable operation for these devices,
• for demonstrating and implementing various multiplexing approaches for TES sensors including SQUID-based times division multiplexing (TDM), code division multiplexing (CDM) and microwave frequency division multiplexing (μFDM) as the means to realize arrays with higher multiplexing factors and/or higher bandwidth, and,
• for overseeing and implementing the construction of many large TES sensor arrays that have been deployed in various applications, such soft x-ray analysis for material analysis, alpha particle detection for nuclear treaty verification and for to understanding details of the formation of the universe.


Evangelos Trifon Laskaris

For pioneering contributions to the design and construction of superconducting magnets for magnetic resonance imaging systems, and continued efforts to increase affordability and penetration of MRI equipment to underserved regions of the world, in particular,
• for his pioneering leadership in designs and technologies that resulted in commercial production of MRI magnets with reduced fringe field, improved patient comfort, and higher image quality.
• for his effort to produce the first cryogen-free conduction cooled superconducting magnet for MRI systems,
• for his pioneering contributions in the development of superconducting rotating machines for power generation including a 20-MVA utility-type generator, and a 20-MW high-power-density generator for the U.S. Air Force.


Justin Schwartz

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his pioneering work in the development of high field superconducting magnet using high temperature superconductors;
• for his innovative research into quench detection and protection of HTS magnets, including the use of ancillary materials and novel computational approaches for conductor and magnet optimization, and,
• for training numerous graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in applied superconductivity and partnering with small businesses to promote the growth of an HTS-based industry.

Joseph Minervini

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his contributions to numerous magnet systems for fusion energy, magnetic levitation, energy storage, power generation and transmission, magnetic separation, high energy and nuclear physics, medical applications, and,
• for his contributions as the U. S. Principal Investigator for the International Reactor (ITER) project which resulted in the design, fabrication, and testing of the Central Solenoid Model Coil, then the world's largest and most powerful pulsed superconducting magnet.


Vasili K. Semenov

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology, in particular:
• for playing a major role in the invention and development of Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) digital logic family based on the processing of single flux quanta in Josephson junction circuits,
• for his work in developing superconductor analog to digital and digital to analog converters,
• for his effort in development and experimental demonstration of physically reversible superconducting circuits with ultimately low power dissipation, and,
• for mentoring a significant number of the current generation of superconductor digital circuit designers.


Herman H. J. ten Kate

For continuous and significant contributions in the field of large-scale applications of Superconductivity, in particular for:
• his pioneering work in the construction of the first full-size accelerator dipole magnet employing Nb3Sn wire, operating above 11 tesla;
• his technical and managerial leadership in the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the ATLAS Superconducting Magnet System, and,
• training numerous young engineers and scientists on technical superconductors and application in magnet systems.

Michael A. Green

For continuing and significant contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for his role in designing, building and testing numerous superconducting magnets and associated cryogenic systems for experiments in various laboratories around the world and for various particle accelerators and their detection systems, and,
• for his services as Chair and Editor of many international conferences including the Applied Superconductivity Conference, the International Cryogenic Materials Conference, and the Magnet Technology Conference.


Clark Hamilton

For continuing and significant contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology, in particular:
• for his work in developing high speed, high-resolution superconductor analog to digital converters and,
• for his effort to develop the Josephson voltage standard into a robust system and for promoting and expediting its acceptance worldwide as the International Primary Voltage Standard.

Shinya Hasuo

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of small-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for directing the superconducting digital effort at Fujitsu Laboratories in the 1980s which developed a whole wafer process capable of fabricating fully functional niobium chips with Josephson junction densities greater than 20,0000,
• for fabricating and testing a superconducting microprocessor with a critical path capable of operating at frequencies more than 10 times faster than a comparable GaAs circuit, which was then state of the art, and
• in recent years, for directing the superconducting digital effort at the International Superconductivity Technology Center (ISTEC) in Japan


Yukikazu Iwasa

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his pioneering work in developing techniques for making superconducting joints between NbTi and Nb3Sn wires, and most recently MgB2 wires;
• for formulating the basic design principles to enable high-performance ("adiabatic") LTS magnets used for NMR and MRI to operate nearly quench free;
• for applying HTS into NMR and MRI magnets.
• for educating students and postdocs, and hosting many visiting international scholars to the MIT Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory and,
• for authoring the informative textbooks, "Case Studies in Superconducting Magnets," 1st Edition (1994) and 2nd Edition (2009).


Alvin Tollestrup

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity with emphasis on magnets for accelerator applications, in particular:
• for his efforts in leading the pioneering design, testing and commissioning of 1,000 superconducting magnets into the Tevatron at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the
• first large-scale application of superconductivity, and,
• for his efforts in applying the technology of superconductivity to all areas of particle physics and for his leadership in the collaboration of applying high-temperature superconductors to advanced accelerators such as a muon collider.


Bernard Turck

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large-scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for the invention of the Tore Supra conductor and for his major role in the commissioning of the Tore Supra superconducting magnet system at CEA–Cadarache, which has been in operation for more than 20 years,
• for his involvement in the development of 40 kA dual channel niobium-tin cable in conduit, a new concept which has been selected for use in ITER, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, and,
• for playing a major role in demonstrating that superconductivity and fusion are compatible technologies.

Paul L. Richards

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor high frequency detectors and mixers, in particular:
• for pioneering the development of SIS devices as mixers and detectors of microwave and millimeter wave radiation specifically for radio astronomy,
• for pioneering the use of superconductor transition edge bolometers and arrays of these bolometers with SQUID readout electronics which have been used for many astronomical applications, and
• for his many contributions to the mapping of the sky at millimeter wavelengths using superconducting


William B. Sampson

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for designing some of the first superconducting magnets with magnetic fields exceeding 10 Tesla,
• for pioneering the development of superconducting accelerator magnets using "cosine theta" windings,
• for designing and building one of the earliest 6 Tesla wiggler magnets used in the Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source, and,
• for pioneering development of HTS magnets capable of operating in high radiation environments and for possible use in future accelerator applications.

Hisao Hayakawa

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology, in particular
• for his pioneering work in promoting the use of refractory materials, such as niobium and niobium nitride, for the fabrication of Josephson digital circuits and for promoting large scale integration of Single Flux Quantum circuits using trilayer technology,
• for pioneering work in promoting and developing high temperature superconductor Josephson Junction devices and integrated circuits, and
• for his leadership role in recent ISTEC programs to mature both low temperature and high temperature superconductor digital circuits and systems.


Akira Yamamoto

For significant and sustained contribution in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his contribution to the development of various types of superconducting magnets for High Energy Physics and Particle Accelerator application such as the Large Hadron Collider, and
• for his leadership in the development of particle detector magnets utilizing high-strength aluminum-stabilized Nb-Ti superconductor technology in Particle and Astroparticle Physics

Lucio Rossi

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his leadership of the Magnet and Superconductor Group in the Accelerator Technology Department at CERN where he was responsible for the acquisition of 1232 superconducting dipole magnets and 392 superconducting quadrupole magnets for the Large Hadron Collider which was the largest single acquisition of superconducting devices in the world.
• for his contributions in the design of various earlier superconducting magnet systems such as the ATLAS BT toroid detector at CERN, and,
• for his mentoring and training, while he was at the University of Milan and INFN, of many of the next generation of leaders in the superconducting magnet community.

Alex I. Braginski

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor applications, in particular:
• for his early work on the fabrication of A-15 conductors and the investigation of their ac losses
• for the fabrication and investigation of A-15 Josephon junctions
• for his leadership of the group at the Westinghouse Central Research Laboratory where he directed a broad program encompassing superconductor materials and both large scale and small scale applications of superconductors
• for his contributions to the technology of HTS thin-film rf SQUIDs, and,
• for his leadership of the group at the Forschungszentrum Julich where he directed a broad and varied research program in HTS thin film technology and SQUID device physics and applications


Herbert Freyhardt

For outstanding and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting materials and conductors; in particular:
• for his early work on the role of dislocations and precipitates on flux pinning in low temperature superconducting materials
• for the development of innovative powder metallurgical technologies
• for the processing of A-15 superconductors
• for pioneering the use of Ion- Beam-Assisted-Deposition (IBAD) techniques for the preparation of YBCO tapes and coated conductors and encouraging programs for the development of coated conductor employing yttrium-barium-copper-oxide (YBCO) technology, and
• for playing an important role in organizing many very influential workshops on flux pinning and processing of low and high temperature superconductors and, subsequently, chairing the initial European Conference on Applied Superconductivity (EUCAS)


Daniel F. Leroy

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular:
• for his role in the design, specification, procurement, test and acceptance of 1200 tons of niobium titanium conductors that have been completed within budget and in time to be used in the manufacturing of the magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)
• for employing his broad competences in material sciences, magnetic, mechanical and cryogenics engineering, in the innovative design and construction of the most successful superconducting accelerator magnet models paving the way to the LHC as well as in other relevant aspects of accelerator physics, in many CERN projects, and,
• for educating and training many generations of young researchers at CERN.

Romeo Perin

For significant and continuous contributions to large scale applications of superconductivity; in particular:
• for his many contributions in both design and construction of magnets for particle accelerators, including:
• the design and construction of the pioneering project Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) quadrupoles
• the realization of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) magnets at CERN from the design of the first models and prototypes through the difficult and critical phase of industrialization
• for the leadership of the magnet group responsible for developing magnets and superconductors at CERN

Konstantin K. Likharev

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconductor digital electronic technology as a researcher, educator and mentor, in particular,
• for promoting the development Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) digital logic and for pioneering its application in digital technology
• his leadership of two world renowned research groups in the physics and applications of superconductor and single-Cooper-pair devices and circuits, initially, at Moscow State University and, later, at Stony Brook University
• and for his authorship of many seminal papers and books on Josephson junction physics and technology, macroscopic quantum effects and single-Cooper-pair devices.


Alfred D. McInturff

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of large scale applications of superconductivity, in particular,
• for his many contributions in both conductor development and magnet design, construction and testing at various high energy physics research institutions, including the quadrupole magnets for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center’s Single Pass Linear Collider’s triplet focusing magnets and the final focus of Fermila>Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Texas A&amb’s Tevatron Collider interaction regions
• varying roles from Project to Test Director of “Accelerator Systems String Test 1 and 2 milestone” efforts of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory
• as a member of CERN’s Large Hadron Collider’s String#1 Test team, and, most recently
• as a member of the Supercon group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory that produced a series of record setting high field (13-16T) dipole magnets.

Hiromi Hirabayashi

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting magnet technology, in particular:
• for his pioneering work in the development of high field superconducting magnets and their associated cryogenic systems for high energy physics applications both in Japan and internationally
• for training several generations of young researchers in all aspects of particle accelerator technologies
• for the leading role he has played in promoting superconducting magnet technology for accelerator applications through various domestic and international collaborations, conferences and societies

Fernand D. ("Doc") Bedard

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting electronics, in particular:
• for his long term support of low temperature superconducting digital technology for high performance computing, beginning with the Cryotron in the early 1960s and the IBM Josephson Computer Technology project in the 1970s, and including the Hybrid Technology Multi Threaded (HTMT) petaflops computing program
• for his promotion of the use of superconducting circuits for high performance switches and routers for communications and computing applications, specifically for conceiving the architecture, designing the circuitry and managing the program which has yielded a 128 by 128 self-routing cross-bar switch which can process 2.5 Gbit per second data streams per channel, which is the most complex functional LTS digital system built to date
• for his continuing advocacy of systems-level demonstrations of Josephson digital solutions


John Clarke

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting electronics as a researcher, educator and mentor, in particular:
• for the elucidation of the fundamental noise limitations of SQUID magnetic sensors
• for the evaluation and exploitation of SQUID magnetic sensors in geophysical exploration, NMR, NQR and MRI
• for low noise SQUID amplifiers, for mentoring a large number of students who subsequently have played major roles in superconductivity research and development groups throughout the world
• for being an articulate advocate for SQUID technology at technical, scientific, and medical conferences and workshops


Henri Desportes

For significant and sustained contributions to the field of superconducting technology, in particular:
• for his role in the development of many accelerator and detector magnet systems for high energy physics, including first superconducting magnets for polarized targets, the 15 foot bubble chamber at Argonne National Laboratory, the Hybrid Spectrometer bubble chamber at CERN, the first thin wall solenoid CELLO at DESY, the ALEPH solenoid for LEP and the early designs of both CMS and ATLAS detector magnets for the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN.


D. Bruce Montgomery

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting magnet technology, in particular:
• for the leadership he provided in the development of magnet technology for numerous large scale superconducting application including magnetic confinement fusion, MHD power generation, magnetic levitation and propulsion, magnetic separation, and medical applications
• for his long service as a technical leader at the MIT Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory and later at the Plasma Science and Fusion Center
• for his authorship of the book entitled "Solenoid Magnet Design: The Magnetic and Mechanical Aspects of Resistive and Superconducting Magnets," which was published in 1969, but has remained a standard reference book for magnet design


John Purcell

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting magnet technology, in particular:
• for the design and his leadership in the construction of some of the largest superconducting magnets built, including the 12 foot bubble chamber magnet at Argonne National Laboratory, the 15 foot magnet at Fermi National Laboratory and the U-25 superconducting MHD magnet at the High Temperature Institute (Moscow)
• for his service as the chairman of the magnet technology design team for the International Tokamak Reactor
• for his leadership in establishing several commercial companies which developed numerous specialty magnets including one of the first magnets used in mobile MRI, and pulsed superconducting magnets used in the beneficiation of kaolin which can be used in the harsh, industrial environment of the clay mines

Peter Komarek

Prof. Dr. Peter Komarek was recognized for "significant and continuing contributions to large scale superconductive applications, in particular:
• for his keen analytical insights into all aspects of large magnet development
• for his leadership over more than twenty years of the outstanding program in fusion magnet development at the Research Center, Karlsruhe
• for his tireless and successful efforts for the cause of applied superconductivity throughout Europe."

Martin Nisenoff

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting electronics, in particular:
• long and continuous service to the superconductivity community as a scientist, program manager, activist, and statesman;
• elected three times to Applied Superconductivity Conference board,
• long-standing member of IEEE's Committee on Superconductivity;
• three-decade career spanning activities in Josephson junctions, SQUID applications, HTS filters, and cryocoolers


Arnold H. Silver

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconductive electronics, both as a researcher and as an R&D manager, including the invention of the superconductive Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) which resulted in the development of ultra-sensitive magnetic sensors and is the basic building block for superconductive digital technology, for inventing numerous other superconducting analog and digital circuits and subsystems, and for outstanding insight in promoting the use of superconducting electronics in scientific, military and commercial applications.


Z. John Stekly

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting magnet systems, and devices, in particular the pioneering work in understanding, quantifying, and applying the engineering thermal stability requirements of superconducting magnets operating in boiling liquid helium, which is commonly known as the "Stekly Criterion."


Theodore Van Duzer

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting electronics as a researcher, educator, and mentor, in particular for directing numerous innovative research projects in superconductive device and circuit concepts, for mentoring many students who have become the core of the US activity in superconductive electronics, for his co-authorship of the standard textbook on superconductive devices, for serving as the founding Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity, and for his enthusiastic support to the establishing, and frequently chairing, various conferences, workshops and study groups promoting the growth of the superconductive electronics technology.


Martin N. Wilson

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of large-scale superconductive applications, in particular,
• the pioneering research leading to the fundamental principles of superconducting magnet design and execution,
• for his documentation and explanation of these concepts and calculations pertaining to, for example, magnetization, minimum quench energy, quench development, etc., concisely presented in his book on superconducting magnets, and,
• in recognition of his leadership of outstanding forefront scientific and engineering teams involved in applied superconductivity in research laboratories and industry, for example, the development of Rutherford cable and the Helios synchrotron X-ray source.