Award for Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity

To recognize a career of meritorious achievements and outstanding technical contributions by a living individual in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity, and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings.

Prize:
Recipients will receive a $5,000 honorarium, a suitably inscribed plaque, and a medallion fabricated from niobium. A waiving of the registration fee at the ASC where the award is given is included.
Funding:
Funded by the IEEE Council on Superconductivity. The award is funded via Council on Superconductivity Award Fund in the IEEE Foundation.
Presentation:
To be presented at a plenary session of the Applied Superconductivity Conference. After the selection has been made, the awardee shall be encouraged to make a presentation at that plenary session on a topic of his/her choice in the field of applied superconductivity.
Basis for Judgement:
Individuals will be judged for contributions in the field of applied superconductivity over a period of time (nominally more than twenty years) based on novel and innovative concepts proposed by the individual, the authorship or co-authorship of a number of publications of major significance to the field of applied superconductivity and the presentation of a number of invited and plenary talks at major national and international conferences and meetings in applied superconductivity.
Eligibility:
Must have been active in the field of applied superconductivity for at least twenty years; must have attended at least three Applied Superconductivity Conferences and must be able to attend the Applied Superconductivity Conference at which award will be made. Land and email submissions accepted.
Nomination Details:

Nominations of candidates for the IEEE Council on Superconductivity Awards can be made by any member of the applied superconductivity community (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity). Members of the Awards Committee may also nominate candidates for the Award.

The documentation necessary to complete the nomination shall include a nomination letter, a detailed curriculum vitae (CV) and completed Nomination Form. The CV should contain detailed contact information for the candidate, the candidate’s educational and employment background, a list of honors, awards and other recognitions (both from IEEE and other organizations) that the candidate has received, and a list of his professional duties that document the role the candidate has played in advancing the science, technology, and commercialization of applied superconductivity. The Nomination Form asks the nominator to identify three (or four) major contributions the nominee has made toward the advancement of applied superconductivity and to describe the impact of these significant scientific, technological or management accomplishments have had on the field of applied superconductivity. Additionally, the nominator must include three letters of endorsement from other members of the applied superconductivity (defined as anyone who has attended at least five previous international conferences on applied superconductivity).

The online nomination form (including the letters of endorsement) must be completed no later than 11:59 PM  (UTC) on 24 January of the year in which the award will be presented (unless extension announced).

For further information on the Continuing and Significant Contributions in the Field of Applied Superconductivity Award, contact:

Joseph Minervini
Chair, Technical & Service Awards Committee
IEEE Council on Superconductivity
[email protected]

Nomination Form:
Sorry...This form is closed to new submissions.

Recipients

Henri Desportes

For significant and sustained contributions to the field of superconducting technology, in particular:
• for his role in the development of many accelerator and detector magnet systems for high energy physics, including first superconducting magnets for polarized targets, the 15 foot bubble chamber at Argonne National Laboratory, the Hybrid Spectrometer bubble chamber at CERN, the first thin wall solenoid CELLO at DESY, the ALEPH solenoid for LEP and the early designs of both CMS and ATLAS detector magnets for the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN.


D. Bruce Montgomery

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting magnet technology, in particular:
• for the leadership he provided in the development of magnet technology for numerous large scale superconducting application including magnetic confinement fusion, MHD power generation, magnetic levitation and propulsion, magnetic separation, and medical applications
• for his long service as a technical leader at the MIT Francis Bitter National Magnet Laboratory and later at the Plasma Science and Fusion Center
• for his authorship of the book entitled "Solenoid Magnet Design: The Magnetic and Mechanical Aspects of Resistive and Superconducting Magnets," which was published in 1969, but has remained a standard reference book for magnet design


John Purcell

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting magnet technology, in particular:
• for the design and his leadership in the construction of some of the largest superconducting magnets built, including the 12 foot bubble chamber magnet at Argonne National Laboratory, the 15 foot magnet at Fermi National Laboratory and the U-25 superconducting MHD magnet at the High Temperature Institute (Moscow)
• for his service as the chairman of the magnet technology design team for the International Tokamak Reactor
• for his leadership in establishing several commercial companies which developed numerous specialty magnets including one of the first magnets used in mobile MRI, and pulsed superconducting magnets used in the beneficiation of kaolin which can be used in the harsh, industrial environment of the clay mines

Peter Komarek

Prof. Dr. Peter Komarek was recognized for "significant and continuing contributions to large scale superconductive applications, in particular:
• for his keen analytical insights into all aspects of large magnet development
• for his leadership over more than twenty years of the outstanding program in fusion magnet development at the Research Center, Karlsruhe
• for his tireless and successful efforts for the cause of applied superconductivity throughout Europe."

Martin N. Wilson

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of large-scale superconductive applications, in particular,
• the pioneering research leading to the fundamental principles of superconducting magnet design and execution,
• for his documentation and explanation of these concepts and calculations pertaining to, for example, magnetization, minimum quench energy, quench development, etc., concisely presented in his book on superconducting magnets, and,
• in recognition of his leadership of outstanding forefront scientific and engineering teams involved in applied superconductivity in research laboratories and industry, for example, the development of Rutherford cable and the Helios synchrotron X-ray source.


Martin Nisenoff

For significant and sustained contributions in the field of superconducting electronics, in particular:
• long and continuous service to the superconductivity community as a scientist, program manager, activist, and statesman;
• elected three times to Applied Superconductivity Conference board,
• long-standing member of IEEE's Committee on Superconductivity;
• three-decade career spanning activities in Josephson junctions, SQUID applications, HTS filters, and cryocoolers


Arnold H. Silver

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconductive electronics, both as a researcher and as an R&D manager, including the invention of the superconductive Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) which resulted in the development of ultra-sensitive magnetic sensors and is the basic building block for superconductive digital technology, for inventing numerous other superconducting analog and digital circuits and subsystems, and for outstanding insight in promoting the use of superconducting electronics in scientific, military and commercial applications.


Z. John Stekly

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting magnet systems, and devices, in particular the pioneering work in understanding, quantifying, and applying the engineering thermal stability requirements of superconducting magnets operating in boiling liquid helium, which is commonly known as the "Stekly Criterion."


Theodore Van Duzer

For significant and continuing contributions in the field of superconducting electronics as a researcher, educator, and mentor, in particular for directing numerous innovative research projects in superconductive device and circuit concepts, for mentoring many students who have become the core of the US activity in superconductive electronics, for his co-authorship of the standard textbook on superconductive devices, for serving as the founding Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity, and for his enthusiastic support to the establishing, and frequently chairing, various conferences, workshops and study groups promoting the growth of the superconductive electronics technology.